Current Issue
Vol. 7 No. 1 —   2017

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Essay
After the Election: An ever-present emotional weight
  by  Anya DeNiro

The Second Annual James Tiptree Jr. Symposium: Celebrating Ursula K. Le Guin
  by  L. Timmel Duchamp
Poems
Before Helicopter-Heads Arrived
   by Mark Rich

Continuity Imperative
   by Bogi Takács

The Firebird’s Revenge
   by Sonya Taaffe

Reviews
Testosterone Rex: Myths of Sex, Science, and Society, by Cordelia Fine
   reviewed by Nancy Jane Moore

Spill: Scenes of Black Feminist Fugitivity,
by Alexis Pauline Gumb
  reviewed by Maria Velazquez

The Island of Lost Girls, by Manjula Padmanabhan
  reviewed by Joanne Rixon

Sisters of Tomorrow: The First Women of Science Fiction, edited by Lisa Yaszek and Patrick B. Sharp, with a Conclusion by Kathleen Ann Goonan
  reviewed by Steven Shaviro

Judenstaat , by Simone Zelitch
   reviewed by Bogi Takács

Featured Artist
Janet Essley

The Cascadia Subduction Zone

A decade into the 21st century, the world of books, the world of the arts, the world of criticism have all been caught up in violent, unpredictable change. A large part of this change has been unleashed by a continual stream of technological innovations that impact our daily lives and even our personal as well as professional relationships. Technology is changing how we read and what we read, is challenging the very forms and genres in which we write, and is making criticism and reflection more valuable and necessary than it's ever been.

Despite the many and continual changes reshaping the world of books and the arts, one factor remains constant: work by women writers is always assigned a marginal status in critical venues (except, of course, in venues that focus exclusively on work by women writers).

The CSZ aims to treat work by women as vital and central rather than marginal. What we see, what we talk about, and how we talk about it matters. Seeing, recognizing, and understanding is what makes the world we live in. And the world we live in is, itself, a sort of subduction zone writ large.

“If your takeaway…is that The Cascadia Subduction Zone sounds really interesting, you’re not wrong—it’s a wonderful journal filled with thoughtful and insightful criticism.”
    — Niall Harrison, The Guardian, May 12, 2016